Tag Archives: genetics

Heavy alcohol drinking and potassium channel genes

Alcohol use disorder is a chronic and relapsing brain disease that has damaging, sometimes deadly, consequences for the individual and costs society billions of dollars a year (approximately $223 billion). Despite alcohol use being one of the

Do you get lost?

Many people get lost in unfamiliar surroundings, and many others have problems to find their car in large parking lots. However, certain individuals get lost in places that they are supposed to know intimately, such as their

Variation in fecundity among species and its evolutionary consequences

Predicting the evolutionary trajectories of living species give us the chance to develop informed management policies and preserve species at the brink of extinction. Also, the possibility to understand the consequences of climate change and of introduced,

Family, cholesterol and the genes from the ground up or why screening matters

In 1913, the “cholesterol theory” of atherogenesis was proposed. In the 1930s a genetic disorder, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), which is associated with elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high risk of heart attack at an

Early-onset Alzheimer disease: what are we missing?

Memory is the first brain function that starts to fade away when Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology affects the brain of a patient. Decline of additional cognitive functions, shortly follows. This progressive and irreversible disease, intrudes the life

Mutations in the SORL1 gene affect risk of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, leading to an enormous burden on societies worldwide. In brains of patients with AD, abnormal tangles of a protein called tau are found within nerve cells, in

Sub-Antarctic Fish – how do they do when things get warm?

Scientists are concerned about the fate of marine species, in particular fish, under future climate warming. Because fish body temperature varies as a consequence of variation in the ambient environmental temperature (they are “poikilotherms”), scientists expect that

Embryogenesis explained, organelle of differentiation

The greatest mystery of life is how a single fertilized egg, which is one cell, develops into a fully functioning, sometimes conscious being with many cells of many kinds. We offer a new theory of how embryos

Plants versus pathogens: detection and deception

Novel research has unveiled more about the deception tactics used by plants in their continuous battle against attacks from disease-causing pathogens. These findings could help in breeding better crops to reduce losses and produce more food. In

Impacts of life at 2300 m

Populations all over the world live high up in the mountains. The main mountain ranges with long term settlements include the Himalayas in Asia, the Andes in South America and the Ethiopian highlands in Africa. Researchers could

The genetic secrets of Uveal Melanoma

Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary cancer occurring in the eyes of adults, with 1/100,000 new cases per year in the Western world. Most patients are between 60 and 65 years old. Although it is a

The potential of LINGO-1 as a therapeutic target for essential tremor

Essential tremor (ET) is probably the most common movement disorder. Because the etiology of ET is unknown, treatment of ET is symptomatic and is geared towards reducing the patient’s embarrassment and disability. The first line treatment is

Prader-Willi syndrome: most common genetic cause of life-threatening obesity

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex multisystem genetic disorder. It is recognized as the most common known genetic cause of obesity in humans which can be life-threatening, if not controlled. PWS affects about 1 in 15,000

Which regions of the skull contain the most information about genetic relatedness in monkeys?

The primate fossil record is plagued by issues with assessing phylogeny (genetic relationships among species) due to the fact that fossilized specimens are composed entirely of rock and contain no DNA. Paleontologists studying the primate fossil record

Producing recombinant proteins for human use

Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines are the most frequently used cell lines in the biopharmaceutical industry for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins, because they can be easily genetically manipulated, grow quickly, can be easily adapted