Tag Archives: imaging

Ankylosing spondylitis: what you should know about spinal fractures

The aim of this review article was to provide the required clinical knowledge that radiologists need to know and the relevant radiological semiotics that clinicians require in diagnosing clinically significant injuries to the ankylosed spine. Ankylosing spondylitis

Lung cancer imaging before surgery and the role of brain MRI

Lung cancer kills more people each year than any other cancer worldwide. The best chance at curing the cancer is with surgery, however not all lung cancers can be taken out. Surgeons use a variety of imaging

Acute stroke in 3 brain territories suggests cancer

Over the past several decades cancer has increased to rival heart disease as the leading cause of death in the United States. Non-infectious endocarditis and cancer-associated hypercoagulation (C-AH) have both been suggested as a source of stroke

High content nanotoxicological screening using Raman spectroscopy

In recent years, the potential use of nanomaterials as novel agents in a wide range of areas, from industrial applications to Nanomedicine, has drawn attention to investigation of their toxicological properties. From their production, to use and

Non-invasive whole-body imaging of fibrosis: is it feasible?

Fibrosis is a chronic, life-shortening disease that can occur either as a consequence of genetic defects or in response to inflammation or damage. Such body systems as respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, genitourinary, and reproductive can be affected. Fibrosis

Can imaging of improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease?

The development of new ways for imaging the heart has contributed significantly to our understanding of cardiovascular disease. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) allows us to visualize in great detail the anatomy of the

Visualizing gelsolin amyloid with nanobodies; small molecules with big potential

Amyloidosis is a group of diseases characterized by the deposition of aggregated proteins, or protein fragments, in tissues and organs. The diseases differ from each other in the causative protein, but once aggregation starts, they all result

Chiari malformations and syringohydromyelia in children

More than 100 years ago, Hans Chiari, an Austrian pathologist, described different types of morphological abnormalities of the posterior fossa, the small space in the lower part of the skull just above the spinal canal. The brainstem

Zika virus infection during pregnancy and small heads: What is the connection and what can be seen by imaging

Within the last year, the outbreak of Zika virus infection in Brazil became a “public health emergency of international magnitude and concern”. The global discussions about the risk of Zika virus infection for pregnant women ahead of

Nuclear cardiac imaging: the “old grandma” has still something to say

Ischemic heart disease (IHD) remains one of the most relevant predictors of overall patients’ mortality and a major determinant of sanitary and social costs. Different strategies have been proposed for the early diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, a

Brain imaging of the oldest old who aged successfully

The oldest old, defined as 90 years and over, is the fastest growing segment of the population worldwide. Dementia is one of the major health challenges at this age, since the risk of dementia increases steadily with

Reliable molecular imaging of bioluminescence and NIR fluorescence in vivo

In vivo molecular imaging is a powerful tool for non-invasive analysis of cellular and molecular mechanisms. Whole-body optical imaging of small animals is now widely used in preclinical research to explore disease mechanisms, evaluate drug candidates, and

Embryonic stem cells go against aging

The dream of regenerative medicine is now becoming true by the usage of versatile stem cells that are capable of differentiating into all types of cells in the body. This capability is called ‘pluripotency’ and there are

Using electrochemistry to address current needs in micro imaging

When one thinks of microscopy, usually imagined is something like a compound optical light microscope, which dates back before the 1600’s. For hundreds of years following, the optical microscope has served the scientific community by helping visualize

Routine brain MRIs may not be needed after meningioma surgery

A meningioma is a very common form of a brain tumor that tends to affect elderly patients and women. Most patients with meningiomas do not need any treatment, however, certain groups undergo surgical removal of the tumor.

Combining a range of different imaging techniques to better understand the roles metals play in biology

Microscopes in various forms have helped identify disease-causing bacteria, miniaturize microprocessors and engineer superior metal alloys. However, in biology some things remain very difficult to see even at the highest levels of magnification. Metal ions (e.g. calcium,