Tag Archives: microbiome

What’s really in human milk? Studying microbiota in a novel body site

Breastfeeding is the gold standard of infant nutrition as it reduces children’s risk of developing obesity, asthma, allergies, diabetes, and numerous other medical conditions. This has been historically understood by the fact that breastmilk is rich in

In the pursuit of personalized medicine; New technologies to study the gut microbiome

Humans have a symbiotic relationship with microbes that reside in and on our bodies.  The human digestive tract contains as many as 1014 of bacterial cells, making it one of the densest and most diverse microbial communities

The gut balance solution to obesity

The gut hartbors trillions of microbes that support many critical functions throughout the body (Fig. 1.). These microorganisms collectively are called The Gut Microbiome and are mainly bacteria but are also known to contain yeasts, and even

Not in my neighborhood- herpes simplex virus control of microbiome locality

The players vary, but who is really controlling occupancy of the host mucosal surfaces? The host may no longer be the sole ruling factor controlling the receptor sites for attachment of microbes, and thus membership in the

Identify the bacteria within and on your-self

The human intestine (gut) and other body sites harbor numerous microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, archaea, including fungi), collectively referred to as the microbiome or microbiota. The genome of these microbes encodes for metabolic functions and contribute significantly to the

The apothecary inside us

New drugs might be found right under our noses or, more precisely, in our guts as we learn more about the ways metabolites from intestinal bacteria modulate human metabolic and immunity pathways.  Our recently published paper in

Could a newly-discovered bacteria contribute to cancer?

For many years, doctors and scientists have known that certain viruses, such as human papilloma virus (HPV), are capable of causing cancer.  Until recently, bacteria were ignored as potential carcinogens.  This changed with the discovery that Helicobacter

Mold is meat: Microbes are trophically equivalent to animals in the food-chain

The biological world can be divided into two vast “empires:” 1) organisms that make their own food (i.e., autotrophs, such as plants, algae, phytoplankton), and 2) those that must eat other organisms to live (i.e., heterotrophs, such

The master puppeteer? – Impact of microbes on brain and behaviour

For the longest time microbiology & neuroscience used to be studied independently and with limited overlap. Recently, however, research on the microbiome and its interaction with our organs, including the brain, is increasingly gaining momentum. With more