Tag Archives: microscopy

Biophysical characterization of the potential role of polar lipids for the stability of tear films

The tear film is a thin structure that covers the surface of the eye. It functions as barrier to evaporation, foreign particles, and bacterial infection. These roles can be primarily attributed to the tear film structure and

Mapping the magnetic domain imaging for nano-magnetic films using novel MFM tips

MFM is an extended measurement function of the tapping-mode scanning and lift-mode controlling modes of atomic force microscopy (AFM), where the magnetic domain image is obtained by detection of magnetic force gradient changes between a magnetic tip

Is it possible to overcome microscopic contamination affecting the interpretation of the archaeological record?

Archaeology is a subfield of anthropology, the study of all human culture. This discipline often resorts to several scientific techniques to analyse the archaeological record. For instance, microscopy is intensively used to analyse different materials, such as

Biophysical characterization of monofilm model systems composed of selected tear film phospholipids

While our eyes are open they are constantly exposed to bacterial infections, injury, and dehydration. To provide the necessary protection against these hazards the outer surface of our eyes is covered by a thin layer known as

Faceted liquid droplets wag their tails

Nature typically strives to minimize the energy of a system. Making water flow downhill and a stretched rubber band shrink when released are just two examples. A commonly experienced consequence of this universal principle is the spherical

How do bacteria divide and multiply?

Bacteria interact with our bodies every day, resulting in both positive and negative outcomes. We rely on the billions of beneficial bacteria in our microbiome to support our digestion and immunity. At the same time, pathogenic bacteria

When the physician may identify microscopic tissue architecture in real time

Diagnosis of disease is the fundamental goal of medicine as treatment  and prognosis rely on it. The diagnostic process ends eventually with tissue sampling (biopsy) for microscopic evaluation. The paradigm “tissue is the issue” reflects the modern trend

Tuberculosis in ancient bones can also be identified by a protein of the pathogen

As we all know, DNA is the matrix for the proteins and the proteins are the molecules which are involved in every step of the metabolism of all living organisms inside and outside of cells. Without proteins

Imaging tumor development using next generation raster scan optoacoustic mesoscopy

Cancer is one of the major diseases in the 21st century. Hundreds of billions of dollars have been spent on cancer research in the last half century, but still, our understanding of the disease mechanisms is limited.

Cell vacuum: measuring micro-newton cell adhesion forces using micropipette suction

The force with which cells adhere to their substrate is of interest in the study of various diseases. For example, in the case of atherosclerosis, the disease that leads to heart attacks and strokes, the “leakiness” of

Building a matrix mediated cell expansion system for high-quality cartilage regeneration

Articular cartilage is a tissue found in joints throughout the body (knees, elbows, etc.) that plays a significant role in allowing the body to maintain proper movement and engage in physical activities; it also supports the transfer

Controlling self-assembly processes on 2-D surface

Supramolecular self-assembly on two-dimensional (2-D) surface is a powerful approach to construct functionalized surfaces. In a self-assembly process, molecules assemble via noncovalent interactions such as van der Waals or hydrogen bonding interactions, and form periodic nano structures.

Cooperative effects and co-crystallization in supramolecular diarylethene self-assembled monolayers

The current “top down” strategy that aims to miniaturize silicon based electronic components will eventually reach a limit. A new approach is necessary in order to develop more powerful, less expensive and more flexible electronic devices. Molecular

Heated red blood cells shed vesicles to indicate distress

When a human or animal are exposed to elevated temperature, the body temperature rises. A small increase in the body temperature may result in health problems that include a headache, dizziness, or fainting. Red blood cells are

Digging out self-assembly process of molecules by scanning tunneling microscopy

Molecules are known to spontaneously self – assemble into supramolecular structures in solution, on surface, and also at interface. An appropriate understanding of the process of self – assembly is of critical importance to make sophisticated nanostructures.

An internal granuloma investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy

Caries and Periodontitis are not the only reasons why patients may suffer from problems with their teeth. There are far less frequent occuring phenomena causing dental treatment need, which however are of research interest in respect to