Tag Archives: nutrition

Head in the trough

A healthy and alert clinician is safer and more effective. It has long been known that doctors and surgeons work long and demanding hours with changing shifts, in an environment where the stakes are high. The risk

Mediterranean diet and liver steatosis: the importance of polyphenols

In November 2010 UNESCO officially recognized the Mediterranean diet as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity and defines it as a “set of traditional practices, knowledge and skills passed on from generation to generation, providing a sense

Could the humble banana help mitigate diseases?

Musa acuminata, is the scientific name of the wild species of banana that has reinvigorated interest in finding cures for diseases such as cancer, HIV and many more. The wild banana habituates the tropical and subtropical regions

Using rewards to induce better eating behaviors in children: evidence from a field experiment

According to the Centers for Disease Control, a substantial portion of children—8.9% of two to five-year olds and 21.9% of six to 11 year-olds—can be categorized as obese. Given the adverse effects of pediatric obesity on dietary

Measuring small molecules for nutrition research?

Metabolomics is the study of small molecules that are present in biological samples. These small molecules include amino acids, fatty acids, organic acids and sugars, and are referred to as metabolites. These metabolites reflect the downstream activity

Introducing legume-based ingredients in the niche food market

Legumes are widely promoted for their health benefits, as they are packed with protein, fibre and rich in vitamins and minerals.  At the recommended amount, consumption of legumes lowers the risk of developing heart disease, cancers and

Do ready meals provide adequate nutritional value for the elderly?

The UK is the biggest market for ready meals in Europe, and the single elderly rely more on ready meals than any other group in British society. But do these meals provide adequate nutritional value? A recent

From famine to feast: cells can adapt to nutritional changes

Sometimes we have mostly vegetables, at other times, meat; sometimes we eat much, at other times, little. Our diet can be quite changeable. This is all the more true for animals, which need to content themselves with

Vitamin E helps protect healthy fats critical for brain development

During development, the brain requires more oxygen than any other organ – about 60% of the total oxygen consumed by a growing fetus is used to support the high metabolic demands of neurodevelopment. This means the developing

Nutritional therapy may slow down cirrhosis

One in 400 citizens of western industrialized countries suffers from chronic liver disease or its end-stage, liver cirrhosis. The only definite cure for this is a liver transplant, but the scarcity of organs and required immunosuppression render

Celiac disease and nutrition

Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated enteropathy of the small bowel mucosa, induced by dietary gluten in genetically pre-disposed individuals. It is characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotal or total atrophy of intestinal villi, which improves

Genetics and dietary stress explain low calcium absorption

It is well understood that osteoporosis is influenced by a variety of environmental factors such as age, nutrition, and race. Calcium absorption is one of these important factors and low levels of calcium absorption have been associated

Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and fish oil supplementation during pregnancy

The pregnancy is a time of increased risk for omega-3 deficiency as they are used for the baby’s brain and eye development both before and after birth. Data derived from observational studies have found that low intake

A monkey’s life is full of stress: pressures from a disease and the lack of good food and their effects on abundance

Despite strong links between patterns that individuals deal with others and their success at breeding that ultimately affect the size of animal populations, the particular social and ecological factors that lead to endangerment are not well understood.

From cell to society: a nutritional intervention to offset the age-related loss in lean tissue mass

Society is aware of obesity. Defined by the WHO, obesity is an abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health. A 40y person with normal BMI will progress to obesity at 70y through an annual gain

Physical activity and diet: the two pillars of hercules for health and wellbeing

News by the World Health Organization over the past few days claimed that eating too much red meat has been related to health adverse events including shorter lifespan, cardiovascular disease, and cancers. Remembering Paracelso aphorism: “Sola dosis

Emerging insights from the green world into growth and ageing

Unlike animals whose form and fate is largely determined a brief embryogenesis, plants typically elaborate variable forms more gradually, and in some cases can grow for thousands of years. These differences can be largely attributed to distinct