Tag Archives: brain

Conformal invariants for landmark curve based brain morphometry analysis

Abnormal structural changes measured on cortical surfaces are important biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In brain imaging research, landmark curves are usually delineated on cortical surfaces to represent significant sulcus and gyrus patterns. Landmark curves are widely

Crosstalk between gut, brain and metabolism in polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder of women in childbearing age, is characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo-anovulation and polycystic ovaries in ultrasound. Obesity, a global epidemic, generally accompanies PCOS; but the link between these two

Cannabis reverses ageing processes in the brain

Researchers at the University of Bonn restore the memory performance of Methuselah mice to a juvenile stage. Memory performance decreases with increasing age. Cannabis can reverse these ageing processes in the brain. This was shown in mice

Do you get lost?

Many people get lost in unfamiliar surroundings, and many others have problems to find their car in large parking lots. However, certain individuals get lost in places that they are supposed to know intimately, such as their

How fractalkine is regulated in human astrocytic brain cells

The brain is made up of four major types of brain cells. Neurons, oligodendrocytes, microglia and astrocytes. Neurons (nerve cells) are specialised cells that process and carry ‘messages’ through electrical signals. Oligodendrocytes are cells which are wrapped

Conditioning the brain immune system through physical activity

Staying physically active is one of the most beneficial things that a person can do for maintaining whole-body health. It is well understood that physical activity is important for building muscle, improving cardiovascular health, and boosting metabolism.

Epileptic encephalopathies in children: Animal models may change the word “catastrophic” to “hopeful”

Seizures are a sign of brain dysfunction caused by abnormal, hyperexcitable brain circuits. Clinical seizures range from brief staring spells to massive whole – body convulsions. The developing brain is especially prone to seizures and seizure-related brain

Why won’t my doctor scan my brain?

An estimated 16 million people each year go to their doctor because of a headache. Many are concerned that they may have cancer, a stroke or an aneurysm, and request a brain scan. However, most headaches do

The brain doesn’t navigate quite like a GPS

Neuroscientists’ discovery of grid cells, popularly known as the brain’s GPS, was hailed as a major discovery. But new results suggest the system is more complicated than anyone had guessed. Just like a driver in a car,

Sugar consumption can be reduced by tonic activation of dopamine reward pathway

Rewarding ( pleasurable ) and aversive events give us dissimilar perceptions, which powerfully shape our decisions and therefore behavioral outcomes. In fact, chemical changes, which take place in our brain, are very different under these opposite circumstances.

Do all children have equal access to Phase I cancer trials?

Approximately 60% of pediatric cancer patients participate in clinical trials compared to only 5% of adult cancer patients.  These pediatric clinical trials have been instrumental in improving the 5-year survival rate of childhood and adolescent cancer patients

Cerebellar and brainstem malformations

The development of the cerebellum and brainstem is a highly complex process that involves a large number of genes. Mutations in these genes may cause an abnormal development of the cerebellum and brainstem and result in several

Non-invasive brain stimulation: how reliably can we change your mind?

Non-invasive brain stimulation is becoming increasingly popular within scientific research. This is because it has the ability to painlessly influence targeted regions of the brain, without the side effects associated with many medications. At first glance, the

Brain structure predicting functioning at a later stage in live in individuals at increased risk for psychosis

Psychosis is a severe mental disorder that is characterised by symptoms of hallucinations, delusions, confused and disturbed thoughts, and lack of insight and self-awareness. Most individuals who are at increased risk for developing psychosis do not develop

Strollers and carriers cause average of two injuries every hour in the U.S.

The Center for Injury Research and Policy of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital published research about children getting injured from strollers and carriers in Academic Pediatrics in August 2016. Parents use these products every day

Acute stroke in 3 brain territories suggests cancer

Over the past several decades cancer has increased to rival heart disease as the leading cause of death in the United States. Non-infectious endocarditis and cancer-associated hypercoagulation (C-AH) have both been suggested as a source of stroke