Tag Archives: signaling

Receptors talking: solo vs chorus

Receptors talking: solo vs chorus. Atlas of Science

Multi-cell organisms, including humans, need reliable and timely communication between cells to function. Every cell is surrounded by the plasma membrane made of lipids, which separates it from the environment. Receptors localized on that membrane are proteins

Do you want a specific signal? Go local! Imaging our way to targeted therapy

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous intracellular second messenger, a small molecule that conveys the information carried by hormones, neurotransmitters and other extracellular stimuli to the intracellular environment. cAMP is generated at the plasma membrane when

The cellular protein (cFLIP) downregulates IFN-alpha, a signaling protein involved in the pathogenesis of SLE

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disorder that manifests itself within various organs of the body. It is observed in women more often than men. While clinical presentations may vary widely, hallmarks of SLE include

The NO-heme signaling hypothesis

The importance of the NO-synthase(NOS)/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) signaling for health and disease is undisputable (Nobel Prize in Biology and Medicine, 1998). Many studies demonstrated that this pathway is critically implicated in the regulation of cardiovascular, nervous,

Emerging roles of cyclic nucleotide gated channels in plants

Plants are vulnerable to various biotic and abiotic stresses imposed in their respective growth environment. These stresses negatively affect the normal growth, development and productivity. Unlike animals, which can move to conditions conducive for growth and development;

Phospholipase C break membrane lipids during plant adaptation under stress

Plants constantly encounter various biotic and abiotic stresses in the environment. These stresses present adverse growth conditions, which affect the plant development, longevity and productivity. The crop production is decreasing rapidly due to the negative impact of

The matrix reloaded: how a self-produced extracellular matrix controls the development of multicellular microbial communities

In nature, many bacteria live in multicellular communities called biofilms. Biofilms offer their resident bacterial cells protection from environmental insults and assaults, and better attachment to hosts. For humans, they have medical and industrial costs, but also